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FILM PRODUCTION BLOG » BRITISH SLANG

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There are 11 messages in total. Showing messages 1 to 11.
madbirdee Posted: Jun 18th 2008

Hi! I love W & G. Just a question... I understand most of the British slang, but I'm stumped about "tombola". In "Curse of the Wererabbit", Tottie mentions it before the vegetable competition when all the fun carnival stuff is being set up. Being a bone-headed American (try not to hold it against me!), I have no idea what that would be, though it sounds like fun!

I would be completely chuffed (see! I do catch on!) if some kind person could fill me in.

Ta! In advance!


jordan Posted: Jun 18th 2008

a tombola what is used at fairs and events , it is a drum that rolls to mix up tickets and you pick out a winning ticket from it.

(its not slang) its like "marrow" was changed to "melon" for USA audiences in COTWR

http://images.google.co.uk/images?hl=en&q=tombola&um=1&ie=UTF-8&sa=N&tab=wi


madbirdee Posted: Jun 18th 2008

aw, thanks, chuck!! (tee hee!) and the whole "marrow/melon" issue was a little confusing to us here. the last scene doesn't make a lot of sense without that context. in the u.s., "melon" is slang for your head, so when Tottie talks about Gromit's 'melon', it gave me pause.

thanks again!


jordan Posted: Jun 19th 2008

no probs glad to help


squigly Posted: Jun 20th 2008

Jordan, could you give an example in the COTWR movie where they switched out marrow for melon?


madbirdee Posted: Jun 20th 2008

...and also, jordan, since you're so helpful!!!

how about "Lummy day!" from the context, doesn't seem good!

btw, excuse my idiocy again, but "marrow" is the same as "melon" then?
sorry i'm so thick!


jordan Posted: Jun 20th 2008

i will look


gromitlove Posted: Jun 20th 2008

tombola=raffle
marrow=squash


gromitlove Posted: Jun 20th 2008

maybe they made "marrow" into "melon" so as not to have to change the mouth shapes.


jordan Posted: Jun 21st 2008

marrows are different than melons, im no veg expert but google it

and "lummy day" is probley "lovely day"


Sammy the lamb Posted: Feb 18th 2009

Lummy day means "Good grief!" Or, "My goodness!"




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